Returning Indian Expats Prefer Bangalore, New Delhi and Mumbai

According to the Times of India, Bangalore hires the highest proportion of returning overseas Indians (NRIs or non-resident Indian as they are still oxymoronically called) in its workforce.  It is especially relevant in the IT, pharmacy and healthcare sectors, where they prefer to hire candidates with international exposure, as told by Rajesh Kumar, CEO of a global recruitment consulting firm, MyHiringClub.

Companies that are especially looking into expanding globally need to understand global practices and specific markets. Studies conducted under MyHiringClub indicate NRI professionals accounted for 21% of total lateral hiring in India.  The IT & ITES sector has seen the number of NRI hiring at 23%, pharmacy and healthcare accounted for 21%, FMCG 18% and infrastructure 11%.

Share:
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter

October 26, 2012   No Comments

Bangalore and Mumbai are most the Expensive cities for Average Indian Consumers

Analysis of the most recent Consumer Price Index data released by Reserve Bank of India shows that Bangalore has the highest average cost of living in India, followed by Mumbai, then Chennai, Kolkata, and Delhi.

This is a chart from The Times of India, which indicates the CPI scores of the six different cities mentioned.

There are a variety of factors that contribute to the differential living costs of the cities, including aspirations of the people, political advantage and other factors. Here is an example of the variations in the price of cooking gas (LPG) cylinders, a staple need  for most households, since  piped gas is not available very widely yet.

City LPG Cylinder Price
Bangalore Rs 415 (USD$7.71)
Mumbai Rs 402 (USD$7.47)
Chennai Rs 393.50 (USD$7.31)
Kolkat

Rs 405 (USD$7.52)

Delhi Rs 399 (USD$7.41)

Economist Vibhuti Patel of Mumbai’s SNDT University points out that Mumbai has very high rents. She also says basic food items like vegetables, fruits and grains are likely to cost more in Mumbai than Delhi, since the latter is closer to Punjab and other agricultural states.

Share:
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter

October 26, 2012   No Comments

Another Fortune 500 Company sets up R&D Center in Mumbai

A research and development  facility was established in Mumbai, India’s largest city by Ashland global specialty chemical company.  The newspaper, BusinessLine,  states the center will cater to personal and home care companies in India  such as Unilever, Procter & Gamble, Colgate Palmolive, L’Oreal, Godrej Consumer Products, Emami, Dabur India, Cavin Kare, Himalaya and Marico Industries.

With the increasing expectations of consumers to create higher-performing products, this facility will provide technical support to accommodate to the anticipation.  There are formulation laboratories for hair, skin, oral and home care, controlled environment laboratories for measurement science to support claims substantiation and a microbiology laboratory for preservative optimization and micro challenge test.

Quoted in Cosmetics Design Nandkumar Dhekne, vice president, Asia Pacific, Ashland Specialty Ingredients, said that  a technical center in Mumbai will prove beneficial for the Indian and global market,  “We anticipate that the Mumbai technical center will generate great ideas that will be channeled back into our global innovation funnel.”

Share:
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter

October 24, 2012   No Comments

Commercial Kitchens enter India’s “Dabbawallah” supply chain for hot lunches

According to National Public Radio, If you work in an office in India, lunch might travel through a complex network of kitchens, bicycle deliverymen and train stations before ending up on your desk. Dabba wallahs have been delivering meals for a century, but over the years, lunchbox fare has changed dramatically.

Every day in Mumbai, some 5,000 deliverymen called dabba wallahs hand deliver 200,000 hot meals to doorsteps across the city. It’s an intricate network that requires precise timing and numerous handoffs from courier to courier. The century-old service is a staple for the city’s office workers. (See how it works in this video.) But as the city has changed, so too has the service.

For decades, Indian workers have had their lunches delivered, but usually from home kitchens. The prices were cheap and the food was traditional Indian fare. But that’s changing.

“This is our main kitchen. … This guy is making the South Indian menu. He’s making a beetroot dosa … then the other guy’s making an egg white omelet over here,” says Nityanand Shetty, head chef at Calorie Care

Share:
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter

September 2, 2012   No Comments

Philips Consumer Lifestyle India sells high end coffeemakers in three top cities

“Consumer lifestyle is reshaping in the country and to be more relevant to the new generation, we need to have local relevance. We believe that coffee culture is fast catching up in urban India and there is an opportunity for us,” Philips India, President Consumer Lifestyle (Indian Subcontinent) A.D.A. Ratnam told a media agency.

The Dutch multinational  identified creation of new categories to supplement consumer lifestyle as one of its growth paths and is banking on products from the portfolio of Saeco International Group that was acquired by its parent Royal Philips Electronics in 2009.

“Our coffee machines are not going to be mass distribution products. These are primarily targeted at those niche customers who have a taste for fine coffee,” he said.  To start with, Philips India has introduced three products priced at Rs 13,995, Rs 54,995 and Rs 74,994. ($280, $1,100, and $1,500). Upscale (very upscale) consumers in Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore across 18 retail points can now savor their Cappuccino, Espressos, Lattes and Macchiatos in style.

What this means:

We don’t know how successful this product line might be, but we can be sure that five years ago, at attempt to sell a $1,500 coffeemaker would not have been taken seriously in India. The times, they are a-changing.

Share:
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter

August 27, 2012   No Comments