India’s NPCIL receives Steam Generators for Kakrapar Atomic Power Station Unit 3

Larsen & Toubro Limited, an Indian multinational conglomerate headquartered in Mumbai has supplied two 700 MWe steam generators for Unit 3 of the Kakrapar nuclear energy plant located in the state of Gujarat. Each  steam  generator  weighs  about 215 tons  and  is  made  of special low-alloy quenched  &  tempered  steel  with nickel-iron-chromium  alloy tubes, and stainless steel internally.

Kakrapar Nuclear Energy Plant

Kakrapar Nuclear Energy Plant

“Success was achieved through relentless dedicated joint efforts by L&T & NPCIL engineers,” said M.V. Kotwal president of Larsen & Toubro’s  Heavy Engineering business unit.

Part of India’s efforts to  buil this reactor relies on  L&T Special Steel and Heavy Forgings,  a joint venture between Larsen & Toubro and Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited reports Nuclear Street News.

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July 9, 2015   No Comments

Google, Amazon Expect to Spike Sales in India

Internet Multinational Companies are growing fast in India. Last month, Google announced the setting up of its largest campus outside the U.S., in Hyderabad, India. The 2 million square feet facility — the first company owned premises in Asia — is expected to house 13,000 employees when it’s ready in 2019. Google started its India office with five people and now has more than 2,000 staff across Mumbai, Gurgaon, Hyderabad, and Bangalore.

“India is very important now from twin perspectives: talent and market. We did our Android One global launch in India (in 2014) besides launching other products,” says Rajan Anandan, managing director, Google India.

The growing internet user base is the most important reason for internet companies to expand in India’s market. Television reaches 600 million people. The internet has 300 million users. By 2020, Google expects 600 million online users with online videos being accessed by 500 million people. “It will be a different story then, not only for Google but for all companies,” says Anandan. “Growth is a function of how fast GDP grows. If GDP is 6% the market for internet companies could grow by 12%,” he adds.

Amazon which has been in India since 2004, announced setting up its 11th and largest fulfillment center in India on the outskirts of Hyderabad. “We are planting seeds for the future. India has been mentioned in the shareholder letter by Jeff ( Bezos CEO of Amazon) and that’s big,” says Amit Agarwal, vice president & country manager, Amazon India. Last year, when Bezos was there, he also announced a $2 billion investment push in India.

The Economic Times reports that in 2013 Amazon entered India as a marketplace, and now boasts of a catalog of 22 million products with India being its fastest market to do $1 billion in sales. Amazon operates all its businesses in India: the marketplace Amazon.in, B2B business, Kindle devices and e-book store, and Amazon Web Services, the cloud offering.

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June 5, 2015   No Comments

Japan’s Tosoh Corporation Acquires Bioscience Company in India

As part of expanding and strengthening its bioscience operations, Japan-based Tosoh Corporation has acquired Lilac Medicare an in-vitro diagnostics company headquartered in Mumbai, India, reports BioSpectrum.

Lilac Office, Mumbai

Lilac Office, Mumbai

Established in 1997, the Lilac Group operates in the fields of two main technologies: ELISA and Chemi-luminescence and caters to the diagnostic needs of its customers in the specialties of endocrinology, cancer, tuberculosis, hepatitis, ToRCH and autoimmune diseases. It has recently entered the fields of clinical biochemistry, hematology, and electrophoresis.

By building on Lilac’s network, Tosoh hopes to increase its share in the growing Indian market by using its own immunological and diabetes diagnostic analyzers as stepping stones towards expanding its bioscience business in India.

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May 28, 2015   No Comments

India’s Hotels Accelerate Confectionery, Apple, Nut Imports

According to USDA Foreign Agriculture Service, India’s food service sector continues to expand as the number of travelers increase and more consumers dine at restaurants.

“India’s Hotel Restaurant and Institutional Service sector is benefiting from India’s relatively strong economic growth, stable political scenario, foreign investment, rising incomes, high aspiration levels, a young population, and changing consumer consumption patterns,” quotes the report.

India  is seeing a significant transformation in the restaurant sector. Indian consumers are eating out more frequently and younger Indians are more aware of international franchises and foreign foods. With an estimated 100,000 modern, “organized” restaurants (20 or more seats, wait staff, menus) in India, there is plenty of room for growth in the industry.

It is estimated that Indians spend 8 to 10 percent of their food expenditures outside the home in restaurants, cafeterias and other food establishments. Per the 2013 India food service report published by the National Restaurant Association of India, the restaurant sector is valued at $48 billion and is expected to grow to $78 billion in the next five years.

The market for imported foods has also grown. Developments over the past few years indicate a growing number of professional, brand-oriented importers and an increase in the number of modern retail outlets and hotels. Among four and five-star hotels, imported products include wine, other alcoholic beverages, dairy products, meat, seafood, fruits, frozen french fries, sauces, seasonings, and condiments, drink mixes, and ingredients for foreign cuisines such as Italian, Thai, Japanese, Chinese, Mexican, and Spanish.

However, as the food import community shifts its focus from simply trading to professional brand management, distribution and marketing, importers are increasingly looking to represent foreign exporters in India. Key importers are located in cities such as Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata, Cochin and Goa, but tend to be concentrated in Mumbai and Delhi.

Hotels and restaurants, depending on their procurement systems, buy imported food and beverage products from alternate distribution chains based on the type of products and the volume of the consignment:

  • Imported fresh produce is generally bought from wholesalers and distributors.
  • Imported meats, fish, seafood, and dairy products are obtained from dedicated importers and their exclusive distributors who have the cold chain infrastructure to handle such products.
  • Most establishments procure non-perishable items through distributors or, in a few cases, from importers.
  • A few larger hotel and restaurant chains import specialty items through consolidators based in Dubai, Singapore, or Europe.

Wines and liquors are generally procured through importers, mainly private bonded warehouse operators, as most hotels and restaurants import liquor duty-free against their foreign exchange earning license.

The following flow chart gives an overview of the distribution network for imported food for hotel and restaurant sector buyers.

 

Flow Chart of Food and Beverage Food Service Distribution

Flow Chart of Food and Beverage Food Service Distribution

 

Opportunities for foreign food exporters in the sector are improving, and imports of consumer-oriented foods, led by tree nuts and fresh and dried fruits essentially have doubled since 2008 to $3.2 billion.

 

SOME PRODUCT PROSPECTS FOR THE HRI SERVICE SECTOR

 

Description Total Imports CY 2013-Value ($ millions)  Total Imports CY 2013-Quantity (tons)  5–yr. Import growth by value ( %)  Base Tariffs Key Constraints Over Market Development Market Attractiveness for U.S.
Nuts (mainly almonds) 762 210,969 21 In shell Almonds($0.55 per 2 pounds)

Pistachios(10%)

Competition from other suppliers exists but is not substantial High demand and growing retail industry
Confectionery 661 1,315,052 55 Up to 100% Competition from domestic and foreign suppliers Consumer preference for imported products/brands
Fresh Apples 218 194,335 27 50% Competition from domestic and foreign suppliers Seasonal shortages and high prices,diverse fruits among India’s middle income population and growing retail industry
Fruit Juices 36 5,709 gallons 18 30% Competition from domestic and foreign suppliers Increasing health awareness and shortage of quality products
Sauces, Preparations Mixes, Condiments, and Seasonings  12 5,438 -1 30% Strong competition from domestic brands Consumer preference for imported products/brands and growing fast food culture

 

Since the food supply chain system in India still remains fragmented and multi-layered, an investment in supply chain infrastructure and logistics presents a significant opportunity in India’s HRI market because the value of the food service sector continues to increase, the report says.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 20, 2015   No Comments

Hershey Considers India “Key for Continued Growth”

Global confectionery major Hershey has seen a strong quarter of growth in India, and says it is committed to investing in this emerging market.

Mydigitalfc.com reports that Hershey India, a subsidiary of The Hershey Company, operates both its confectionery and beverage lines from regional sales offices in Mumbai, Delhi, Chennai and Kolkata. The organization’s salesforce of 500 people reach more than a million retail outlets through 1,500 distributors spread across India. The Hershey brands Sofit, Hershey’s Syrup, Jumpin, Soft, and Jolly Rancher are popular with consumers.

“The scale and potential of India is key for our continued growth around the world and Hershey is committed to investing in India,” says Praveen Jakate, managing director of Hershey India.

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April 29, 2015   No Comments