India’s Army to Receive 6 Apache Helicopters

India’s Defense Acquisition Council has approved the purchase of six Apache attack helicopters from Boeing, for $700 million.

The variant of the attack chopper that the Indian Army will get is the Apache AH-64E, which has a height of 15 ft and a wingspan of 17 ft. The helicopter has a primary mission gross weight of 15,075 pounds, with a vertical rate of climb that is more than 2,000 ft per minute and a maximum rate of climb of more than 2,800 ft per minute. The chopper also has a maximum level flight speed of more than 150 knots, reports International Business Times.

AH-64 Apache

August 18, 2017   No Comments

Air India Seeks Loan for Six Boeing Aircraft

Even as the Government of India is working on the final plans for a strategic disinvestment of its stake in loss-making national carrier Air India, the airline is ready with plans to fly to more overseas destinations. The airline seeks offers from banks and financial institutions to arrange bridge financing of up to $740 million for the purchase of six Boeing 787-8 planes, according to a tender document.

An Air India Aircraft

“In addition to the Government of India guarantee, Air India will offer the aircraft as a security. The facility should be a direct loan without the requirement for formation of a special purpose vehicle structure which requires title transfer,” the tender document said.

Air India has a fleet of 110 airplanes, including 33 Boeing aircraft, reports BusinessLine.

 

August 8, 2017   No Comments

India Signs $100 Million Service Deal with Boeing

Seattle-based Boeing and India’s Navy signed a $100-million contract, that requires Boeing to maintain spare parts and personnel in India, ready to respond to any defects or failures in the P-8I fleet over the next three years. This ‘performance-based logistics’ contract requires Boeing to continue the warranty services it has so far provided under an initial production contract, which will expire in October.
Pratyush Kumar, president of Boeing India and vice president of Boeing International said, “With this contract, the Indian Navy can be assured of achieving exceptional operational capability and readiness of the P-8I fleet.”

The Business Standard says that India’s Naval pilots fly their P-8Is on eight-to-ten hour surveillance missions over the Bay of Bengal, the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean. Each P-8I carries seven tonnes of weaponry on board, including advanced Harpoon missiles and heavyweight torpedoes.

Harpoon2 by Boeing

Harpoon2 by Boeing

June 20, 2017   No Comments

India to Be 3rd Largest Buyer of Passenger Planes

With India set to buy 2.2 new airplanes for each of the 480 aircraft currently in service, it is poised to become the third-largest buyer of commercial passenger planes in the world. The U.S. and China are the only countries to have more pending aircraft orders says a report released by the Center for Asia Pacific Aviation, a Sydney-based aviation think tank.

Boeing predicts that India will need 1,850 new planes over the next two decades, and says that these orders will be worth $265 billion. CNN reports that  220 million Indians flew last year — an annual increase of 20% — and the country is on track to overtake the U.K. as the world’s third-largest aviation market by 2026.

However, there are challenges to this expansion: airlines can buckle under the pressure and become defunct; infrastructure such as airports and traffic control will need to gear up to match India’s aviation boom.

 

A plane in flight

June 9, 2017   1 Comment

What Technology Innovations is India Working at?

In his article in Fortune on whether India can become an innovation hub for the world, journalist Ashish Gupta explores India’s capability in cutting-edge technology and disruptive innovation.

In his search for answers, Gupta talks to many stalwarts in the field of innovation: Vijay Govindarajan, Coxe Distinguished Professor at Dartmouth, Marvin Bower Fellow at Harvard Business School, Lakshmi Pratury, founder, host and curator of INK Talks, and Brock Pierce, serial entrepreneur, digital currency visionary, and chairman of the U.S.-based Bitcoin Foundation.

Bower tells him, “The time for incremental change is over; it is time for non-linear, breakthrough innovations, not just for solving the country’s [India’s] complex problems, but also for creating a far more equitable and inclusive society.” Pratury, says, it’s time for India to take some ‘exponential risks’.

Pierce identifies AI as the greatest innovation of our time, and says that perhaps it will define the future of Indian innovation. Sanjeev Tyagi, founder and head of research at Ericsson’s Bangalore research and development center, confirmed to Gupta that his team of researchers are at work on cloud computing, machine learning, and IoT where a group of passengers and a fleet of buses are part of a study that uses data, apply machine learning and machine intelligence to optimize bus routes. Ericsson and Intel are looking into the ability to scale computer/network/storage independently of each other. Tyagi adds that for the interconnected world of the future, we need to “create a system that uses machine learning and IoT for self-learning [learning from the past], self-healing [the ability to find solutions when something goes wrong], and self-organizing, so it can allow new devices to become a part of the system.”

Sriram Raghavan, director of IBM’s research center in Bangalore, says his team is working in the areas of IoT and cognitive computing, IoT and blockchain technology, AI and blockchain technology to create new applications and provide different services to global clients such as Bank of America Merrill Lynch, and Mahindra and Mahindra in India.

India’s HCL Technologies has developed two mission-critical systems for the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner: one to avoid collisions in the air, and another to facilitate landing in zero visibility.

Mumbai-based Tata Consulting Services is investing deeply in high-potential areas such as genomics; metagenomics; integrated computational materials engineering for building stronger, lighter metals; robotics and automation; as also in human-centric systems.

Fortune says: All these are applications of existing technology. Clearly, this is going to be how innovations happen in this country, where the technology may not be original, but the use of it is.

 

Innovation Poster

May 4, 2017   No Comments