Category — Defense/ Security

Bell Helicopter and Tata Advanced Systems Will Co-Produce

Headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, Bell Helicopter will collaborate with New Delhi, India-based Tata Advanced Systems Limited (TASL) to develop both commercial and government (including military) rotary wing markets in India in the Light Utility and Reconnaissance segments.

The scope of this agreement is intended to include potential production and assembly capabilities,  training and maintenance, repair and overhaul requirements, as well as research and development programs and technology sharing that will grow industrial capabilities and result in innovative “Make in India” solutions, reports Defense-Aerospace.com.

“TASL has been a leader in driving industrial growth in India, and its organization ideally complements Bell Helicopter both in terms of innovative thinking, manufacturing capability and a commitment to business ethics, integrity and customer satisfaction,” said Mitch Snyder, president and CEO of Bell Helicopter. “We are honored to build on our relationship with TASL to leverage its experience and knowledge to customize, integrate and manufacture specific local Bell Helicopter solutions for India.”

Bell Helicopter

Bell Helicopter has been supplying helicopters to India for more than six decades, and currently there are more than 90 Bell aircraft operating throughout India in several sectors including commercial, civil/government, and military operations.

“TASL’s alliance with Bell Helicopter is significant because of our shared synergies; our defense manufacturing capabilities and focus on innovation are well aligned with Bell Helicopter’s core competence. This will build on the partnerships that TASL already has in the rotorcraft market allowing it to offer a full range of products to potential customers. The collaboration, which is in line with the government’s ‘Make in India’ initiative, holds potential not only in the domestic market but, will also strengthen India’s position in the international market,” said S. Ramadorai, chairman of Tata Advanced Systems Ltd.

 

 

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August 11, 2016   No Comments

India’s Tata Technologies to Acquire Defense Suppliers

Over the next four years, Tata Technologies, part of India’s $116 billion Tata Group,  plans to acquire a number of secondary and tertiary defense suppliers as part of a corporate plan to grow revenues from $500 million today to around $1 billion by 2020, reports Defense News. Tata Technologies CEO Warren Harris said that his company is actively seeking companies it can buy up in order to grow its global footprint, specifically among those secondary and tertiary firms that make up the U.S. defense supply chain.

Tata Technologies handles a significant portion of Tata Group’s defense work, handling offset obligations from Western defense firms that want to do business with India. In 2008, the company created a joint venture with Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, India’s largest defense aerospace firm focusing on tooling and manufacturing.

“In the last six years our compound annual growth rate is 16 percent,” Harris explained.  “We fully expect to be able to maintain that organically. Our trajectory over the next four years organically sees us going to $800 million, so we see about $200 million in revenue that will come in from acquisitions.”

Harris added that the company will conduct both commercial and defense work. Tata Technologies is about 70 percent automotive, 11 percent aerospace, and 12 percent industrial heavy machinery, and Harris wants to see aerospace grow at a much higher rate than automotive, in order to keep a balanced portfolio.

Jet Plane

The company’s role will remain “secondary to tertiary” in developed markets such as the U.S. and U.K., but it aims to be Tier 1 in India and the Middle East.

“We’re certainly very bullish about the prospects for the Indian government to discharge some of the plans that have been built in for the last 10 years,” Harris said. “We’ve been expecting this wave of procurement decisions that have not been realized, but I think over the last 12-18 months we’re really starting to see signs that will start to happen.”

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August 11, 2016   No Comments

India’s Navy to get 4 Additional Boeing P8i Aircraft

India’s  Cabinet Committee on Security, approved the purchase of four additional Boeing P8-I Neptune Maritime Patrol Aircraft estimated $1 billion . These will be inducted into the Indian Navy over a period of three years.

P-8I Maritime Patrol Aircraft

The P8-I Neptune is an India variant of U.S.A.’s P8A ‘Poseidon’. This aircraft is equipped for long range anti-submarine warfare, anti -surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance in maritime and littoral operations. Its communication and sensor suite includes equipment developed by government defense companies and private manufacturers.  It has  a ferry range of 1,243 miles, where it can patrol the seas for four hours, reports Defense World.  India has already purchased eight of these aircraft since 2008.

 

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July 6, 2016   No Comments

India Seeks 22 Armed Drones from U.S.

Within days of having entered the Missile Technology Control Regime backed by President Obama, New Delhi has expressed interest in buying Predator drones from San Diego, California-based General Atomics through the Foreign Military Sales program.

Defense News reports that according to an official of the Indian Ministry of Defense,  a Letter of Request (LoR) for the purchase of 22 of the unmanned aircraft system for the Indian Navy was sent to the U.S. on June 17.

Drone

The Indian Navy will use the Predator drone, which can fly at an altitude of 50,000 feet, for maritime surveillance and to safeguard its maritime assets in the Indian Ocean, both east and west coast, said an Indian Navy official. These drones have the capacity to fly non-stop for more than 24 hours and monitor the movement of objects as small as a football, sources said.

 

 

 

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June 29, 2016   No Comments

India Admitted to Missile Technology Control Regime

Just days after its bid to join the Nuclear Suppliers Group was put on hold, Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar signed onto the Missile Technology Control Regime aimed at preventing the unchecked proliferation of missiles and their delivery systems. India became the 35th member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). A consensus decision taken by all the group’s members resulted in India’s admission to MTCR.  China is not a member of this group.

The United States welcomed India’s entry into the MTCR. At a press conference on Monday, June 27 State Department press office director Elizabeth Trudeau said India was admitted because it “demonstrated to all MTCR partners a sustained commitment to non-proliferation and it has a legally-based, effective exports control system.”

Take off

To the extent that New Delhi’s accession sees it strengthening its own export controls and is viewed as an enhanced commitment to non-proliferation, it may make it easier for its fellow MTCR members to transfer technologies to India, reports The Diplomat.

India’s will now participate in the groups upcoming activities, including the annual plenary meeting to be held in South Korea in October.

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June 29, 2016   No Comments