Category — Healthcare

Stryker Banks on India R&D to Accelerate Sales in Emerging Markets

Michigan-based medical device manufacturing company Stryker is increasingly relying on its research center based in Gurgaon near New Delhi for new products as it puts into motion an aggressive strategy to accelerate sales from emerging markets such as India and China, reports the Economic Times.

The company’s no frills power tool was conceptualized, designed and developed by the center, which employs 200 engineers and technologists. This tool is used for cutting, drilling and shaping bones during joint replacement and trauma procedures.

Stryker said the product, branded System G, is expected to be commercialized soon and that it will be positioned in the mid-tier segment of the market.

“Growth in emerging markets will be of strategic priority and India offers the most exciting opportunity among the BRIC nations,” Stryker CEO Kevin Lobo told the news publisher on his recent visit to India.

70% of Stryker’s global sales comes from the U.S. and Europe, and the company aims to increase the share of other emerging markets to its global sales from 8% at present to 12-14% over the next five years.

Stryker’s Mako robotic-arm

Stryker’s Mako robotic-arm

It will strive to drive sales of cutting-edge technology-based devices such as Mako, a robotic surgery device used for knee and hip replacement, in India. Its strategy includes plugging the gaps between the high-end, high-priced orthopedic products and the bottom end that is fed mostly by local device makers.

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April 11, 2016   No Comments

MIT Postdoc from India Innovates for the Visually Impaired

Dr. Rohan Paul, a computer science graduate of  Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, a Rhodes scholar in Oxford where he received a Ph.D.in mobile robotics, and a postdoctoral fellow at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Labs, has changed the life of thousands of visually impaired people in India by his innovative SmartCane.

The SmartCane has its genesis as a student project at IIT Delhi when Paul decided he wanted to create an affordable obstacle detection system for blind people. He began by simply asking them what they needed, which was safety, affordability and ease of use, reports The Wall Street Journal.

After returning from Oxford he began refining the device.  Describing it, Paul says, “It is a sleek handle-shaped attachment which fits on the traditional white cane the visually challenged already carry. It sends out vibrations of different kinds to alert the users.”

The device costs $50  whereas comparable devices globally cost upwards of $1,000. Additionally, while the traditional white cane can detect only low hanging objects from a distance of 1.6 feet, the SmartCane can detect both low and above-knee-level objects from a distance of 9.8 feet.

Using the SmartCane

Using the SmartCane

Paul adds, “When we tested it in 2012 we saw users had 95 percent fewer collisions. We released it as a product in early 2014. The SmartCane is already in the hands of about 10,000 people. Our aim is to help one million or more worldwide.

It is a ‘people’s product’a humble tribute to the Mahatma, who inspired innovators to harness science and technology for the masses.”

The device is manufactured and distributed through a partnership of three entities: the Saksham Trust, a Delhi-based nonprofit, manufacturer Phoenix Medical Systems and the Indian Institute of Technology, where Dr. Paul co-founded the Assistive Technologies Laboratory.

Rohan Paul has the honor of being one of MIT Technology Review’s Innovator Under-35 for 2015.

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March 27, 2016   No Comments

Eli Lilly Expands its India Market with Trulicity

In a move to enhance its diabetes portfolio in India, Indianapolis, Indiana-based Eli Lilly launched a once-a-week diabetes treatment drug under the brand name Trulicity, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, a hormone that helps normalize blood sugar levels in those with Type 2 diabetes, reports BusinessLine.

Priced at $37.15, the drug comes as a single-dose pen that does not require mixing or measuring and can be administered at any time of the day, independent of meals, company officials said.

Trulicity Pen

Trulicity Pen

Managing Director of Eli Lilly India, Edgard Olaizola, told Press Trust of India, “We are pleased to be introducing Trulicity in India. We have been committed to diabetes for more than 90 years. We are bringing a new medication to India with a proven efficacy.”

India has more than 60 million people diagnosed with some form of diabetes, with Type 2 the most prevalent. The International Diabetes Foundation estimates India will have 100 million diabetes patients by 2030, with 90% Type 2.

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March 27, 2016   No Comments

India Mandates Online Registration for Medical Devices

India’s Central Drugs Standard Control Organization, responsible for overseeing the country’s medical device market, has implemented an online portal for submission of registration certificates and import licenses to facilitate faster commercialization pathways.

This online registration applies only to notified medical devices, and from April 1 this registration will be mandatory.

This portal will be useful for:

  • Patients who can learn about drug or device approvals
  • Industry that can upload essential documents
  • Consumer who can search registered drugs and get more user-related information on them

Authorized Agents can submit Form-41 registration certificates and Form-10 import licenses, as well as track the progress of registration applications on the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization Website.

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March 27, 2016   No Comments

India’s Medical Device Industry Develops Med-Tech Certification

The Indian Certification of Medical Devices Scheme (ICMED), the country’s first domestically developed quality assurance system, was launched on March 15 to coincide with World Consumer Rights Day. This initiative was the joint effort of the Association of Indian Medical Device Industry, the Quality Council of India, and the National Accreditation Board for Certification Bodies (NABCB).

NABCB’s certification programs are considered on par with international equivalents, especially European and U.S. accreditation bodies, chief executive officer Anil Jauhri said during the launch.

The certification aims to enhance patient safety and consumer protection along with product credentials for Indian manufacturers for instilling confidence among buyers and users. It also aims to eliminate trading of sub-standard products or devices of doubtful origin, reports Medical Devices Daily.

The certification currently offers two options:

An ICMED 9000, on par with ISO 9001 with additional requirements and is aimed at low-risk devices

An ICMED 13485, on par with ISO 13485 with additional requirements and applies for medium- to high-risk devices.

A third level of certification, which will additionally provide medical device specifications for specific products, is being developed by the National Health Resources Research Center under India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

India still imports 70 percent of its medical devices and 40 percent of the imports are from the U.S. alone.

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March 27, 2016   No Comments