Category — Healthcare

Covidien creates India training center

Further developing its capabilities in India,  Covidien PLC has opened a training and education center in India. Quoted in MarketNews Brian D. King, President Emerging Markets said “The Covidien Center of Innovation India in  Mumbai offers clinicians training on advanced procedures and techniques using leading equipment and technology.

The top three priorities will be procedures to address vascular disease, metabolic disorders (obesity and Type II diabetes) and cancer. Mark Rooney, Managing Director, India Subcontinent, Covidien, said, “Chronic diseases contribute to over half of Indian deaths. Cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia and many types of cancers are highly prevalent in urban and rural areas. The India center will have the capacity to train more than 5,000 healthcare professionals annually

Covidien has an important and growing presence in India with offices in Gurgaon, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata and Hyderabad. The company has more than 400 employees in India with a network of distributors and partner hospitals across the country. In 2012, Covidien opened  the Covidien India Engineering Center, in Hyderabad. (Full Disclosure: The company is an Amritt client. This article is derived exclusively from public sources).

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April 30, 2014   No Comments

Innovative partnership to Address Cancer Treatment Market in India

GE Healthcare is jointly investing $130 million with Pennsylvania based Cancer Treatment Services International (CTSI) to set up a chain of 25 cancer detection and treatment centers across India. GE will provide equipment while CTSI, which set up the 250-bed American Oncology Institute in Hyderabad in 2012, will take care of treatment, doctors, medical personnel and related services.

GE Healthcare will be the minority investor, its Chairman and CEO John Dineen told a joint news conference.  According to Dineen, the partnership was a part of its $1-billion commitment to R&D related to diagnosing cancer. GE is also developing low-cost diagnostic technologies ‘in India and for India’ for various diseases, 100 of them targeting cancer alone. It recently launched a low-cost version of PET-CT that is widely used to find cancerous tumors.

Terri Bresenham, Bangalore-based President and CEO of GE Healthcare South Asia, said cancer cases, now at three million, were rising sharply in India, and a large number of its victims were dying due to late detection and high cost of treatment. Also, 1.23 million new cases were showing up each year. CTSI President and CEO Joe Nicholas said the partners planned to start the first few centers in Andhra Pradesh as a hub-and-spoke model, and later try it out in other countries that have similar conditions. The $10-million Hyderabad location has already treated 10,000 people.

What this means

Setting up long-term win-win models may be a good way to enter and expand. India also serves as a crucible to prove out models that can apply in  the developing nations of  Africa, South America and Asia.

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April 30, 2014   No Comments

Medtronic pilots novel ecosystem for ear treatment

In collaboration with a mobile health startup, a design firm and local health clinics, Medtronic is orchestrating improved diagnosis and treatment of ear infections and hearing loss in India. Medtronic is funding  a 70,000 patient pilot but sees it as a program that’s both scalable and self-sustaining. Called Shruti, the programs has screened 11,000 ear patients in India and referred many to receive follow-up care from local ENT surgeons. The programs uses community health workers, a smartphone-based otoscope developed by Icarus Design, and a telemedicine platform developed by MIT spinout ClickMedix.

Field workers at Dr. Shroff’s Charity Eye Hospital in New Delhi and Health Management & Research Institute in Hyderabad were trained on a Medtronic-developed screening protocol and on  how to use the otoscope to take pictures of the middle ear that they would send, through ClickMedix’s telemedicine platform, to ENT specialists stationed back at the clinic. Those remote specialists can confirm diagnosis and issue treatment. Nurses and health workers are on-hand at the camps to treat small infections or remove wax. For complex cases, they recommend an in-person visit to the hospital for further treatment. “It’s really a social business – it’s not philanthropy,” said Medtronic rep Natalie St. Denis.

The screening process usually takes about three minutes. “The health workers that we’re training see about 200 petients per month,” said Ting Shih, the founder of ClickMedix, which develops mobile health solutions with the goal of bringing affordable and quality health services to under-served populations.  “We set up the process, procedure and partnerships, but these programs grow organically on their own without having more support,” Shih said.

What this means

For the people of India, it means expanded access to affordable care. It gives ClickMedix and Icarus an avenue to distribute their products in developing countries, and local ENT specialists the opportunity to treat more patients. Meanwhile it expands Medtronic’s presence in India, a key market for the company.  For other companies looking at India, the key message is that success is not just about superior or even appropriate products. You need to create and nurture an appropriate ecosystem that includes third parties, patients and providers.

 

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April 30, 2014   No Comments

Dell Targets Mid-Sizes Hospitals in India with Cloud Services

Dell is all set to enter the IT healthcare market in India with a focus on mid-sized hospitals and other players in this segment. The company has targeted the healthcare market with a new cloud-based solution.

“We will sell to hospitals with 100 beds or above or if they are smaller, but part of a chain such as  Cloudnine, VisionCare etc. It will not be the Apollos and Fortis because they have solutions available,” Sid Nair, vice-president and global general manager, healthcare and life sciences, told Financial Express.

Elaborating on their strategy, Nair said initially, it will be a three-year business plan for them in India. “We would monitor it for 18 months. If it works here, we will take it to China and Latin America,” he added.

Dell sees untapped potential in India, China and Latin America. “We want to seed the Indian market right now because the government is paying attention. India currently spends 1.5% of GDP on healthcare. It’s going to increase in the next two years,” he said.The Indian healthcare industry is valued at $160 billion as against the US’s $3 trillion. “While healthcare spending in the US is decreasing, it is growing in India by 15%,” Nair said.

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March 29, 2014   No Comments

GE and Cancer Treatment Centers of India to offer cancer services

GE Healthcare, a unit of General Electric Company has formed a strategic partnership with Cancer Treatment Services International (CTSI) to launch a chain of 25 cancer care centers in India. Over a period of five years, the two companies will jointly invest $120 million to set up these centers. The centers will offer state-of-the-art technology for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer at affordable prices, replicating the standards of care found at the world’s leading cancer hospitals.

The cancer care centers will come up across the state of Andhra Pradesh and will progressively expand throughout the country. Per the agreement, GE Healthcare will supply the equipment while CTSI would be responsible for management of medical personnel, treatment and other ancillary services. Following a hub-and-spoke model, each center will be linked to a hub through a sophisticated information technology network supported by a transnational team of doctors and administrators. The hub will provide diagnostic imaging and treatment capabilities, while each center will deliver a range of screening, staging and treatment alternatives.

CTSI offers comprehensive clinical and administrative solutions for treatment of terminal diseases. It presently operates four cancer hospitals in the U.S., making high-quality cancer care accessible at affordable prices. Its healthcare delivery model has proven to be successful in the U.S. and it plans to replicate the success in countries like India, where cancer treatment is still relatively inaccessible and costly.

Currently, India reportedly has at least three million cancer patients, with an addition of 1.23 million new cases every year. As per GE Healthcare estimates, three patients perish in every two minutes due to this deadly disease. The high mortality rates are primarily due to late detection, lack of access to advanced healthcare facilities and high costs related to treatments.

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March 29, 2014   No Comments